Istanbul: A Boat Tour On The Bosphorous

I’m so excited to start posting about our trip to Turkey! I’m starting with Istanbul, which was such a cool city, and HUGE! Even being from Los Angeles, Istanbul felt huge. We barely scratched the surface while we were there and we’re already dying to go back!

After arriving early in the morning and walking all over the city on our first day to start getting a lay of the land, we were understandably quite exhausted. But we were so excited to be there we didn’t want to waste a moment of our time in Istanbul! So we decided to take a boat tour on the Bosphorus around sunset. It was so beautiful, and really gave us a sense of just how enormous and widespread this very old city is.

The Bosphorus is the world’s most narrow international waterway, and separates the continents of Europe and Asia. As a city, Istanbul exists in both contents, connected by bridges and boats.

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The port we shoved off from was a busy hub, filled with similar tour boats as well as smaller boats that I would liken to LA’s food trucks; people on very rocky boats cooking up a storm. Fish sandwiches, kabobs; you name it, they had it.Istanbul172

As people were getting settled on the tour boat, one of the people running the tour walked around offering juices and Turkish tea for the equivalent of 50 cents a piece. Turkish tea, served in these little glasses, was a staple of pretty much any meal or social interaction in Turkey, and helped warm us up in the cool breeze coming off the Bosphorus water. Istanbul171

As we started to pull away, we got a great view of Galata Tower on the European side of the city, which was a very important landmark for us as we tried to find our way around the city. (We were renting a Homeaway apartment right next door, so it was so helpful to be able to see Galata Tower from a distance and know whether we were heading in the right direction!)Istanbul190

I love this photo as we pull away from the European side of the city, the Turkish flag flying at the stern of our little ship.Istanbul175

There was a lot of boat activity on the strait. Tug boats, shipping freighters, and of course lots of tours like the one we were on.Istanbul182

The light houses have the same sense of architecture and history as much of the city.
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We made a brief stop at a port on the Asian side. Much like you would expect from any waterside town, homes have been packed in from the water’s edge all the way up the side of the hills and mountains.Istanbul188

This port was a little less busy than ours was, but was still poised to take hundreds of people on tours up and down the waterway.Istanbul180

There were plenty of incredible landmarks and historically significant sites to see all along the water’s edge. This is Dolmabahce Palace. Built roughly around the year 1850, it served as the administrative location of the Ottoman Empire for most of its life.Istanbul198

The Rumelian Castle (Rumelihisari) is a fortress on the European side of the city built by the Ottomans in the 1450’s before the sultan conquered Constantinople.Istanbul203

This was only one of several weddings we could see from the boat tour! Now a Four Seasons hotel, Ciragan Palace was built in the 1860’s and also functioned as an Ottoman palace. Such an extravagant, embellished design on the face of the building!

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Another result of the Ottomans, Kuleli Military High School was Turkey’s first military high school (founded in the 1840’s). Now it’s used by Istanbul Technical University.Istanbul192 Istanbul193

We loved seeing so many different pockets of the city. All over, there seemed to be so many wonderful areas to explore.Istanbul216

We passed under the Bosphorus Bridge right as the sun began to set. This is one of two bridges connecting the European side to the Asian side of the city. At the time it was built, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world. Istanbul222

As we headed back to where we began, the warm sunset was just beautiful. Our Galata Tower home-away-from-home peeked out in the distance over the city.
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We were able to catch a great view of the Suleymaniye Mosque on our way in too. (We had been there earlier in the day… but more on that in another post!)Istanbul238

There was so much color throughout the city’s architecture, and the colors were really highlighted in the golden hour light.Istanbul242

Just before we docked, we noticed a huge array of seafood restaurants underneath the very bridge we had walked over earlier in the day. There were so many options, I don’t know how you would even begin to choose one!
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After the tour and a quick dinner, and as we made our way back through the crowds and toward the bridge that would take us home, the area seemed to come alive in the darkness. Street food vendors were everywhere, and the bright lights sparked our curiosity at the very least. Istanbul259

There were even people selling t-shirts and clothing along the pavement.Istanbul263We encountered several mobile street vendors on our way home. We definitely got a sense that there is a huge amount of activity in this city after dark!

Overall, the boat tour was a great way to get a broader sense of what Istanbul is really like as a city. When I look at a map and what we were able to do on foot, I realize how very little of the city we were able to visit (even though it felt like we REALLY packed in the sites!) I was grateful for this view of the city, which gave me a much more accurate idea of the scope of it!

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3 thoughts on “Istanbul: A Boat Tour On The Bosphorous

  1. Beautiful picture and it’s awesome that you enjoyed Istanbul so much. I hope you said “merhaba” to my dad while you were there 🙂

  2. Pingback: This Week I Loved… | The Anecdotal Goat

  3. …wonderful pictures…what an amazing cultural intersection, at least geographically…makes me wonder how much cultural intermingling indeed happens at the street level?

    Pa Porter

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